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Can Your Sleeping Position Affect You Low Back Pain?

Low Back Pain (LBP) is the second most common cause of disability in the U.S. Over 80% of the population will experience a form of lower back pain at some point in their life and one of the biggest complaints that Physical Therapists receive about low back pain is how it can impact one’s ability to sleep through the night.
There are many components that can contribute to low back pain at night such as sleeping surface (mattress quality, mattress pad), pillows, room temperature and sleeping position. Research shows that sleep position can affect the alignment of the spine. Aiming for the proper sleep position can put the body into its neutral, or most natural, body position.
• SIDE SLEEPER: try placing a pillow between your knees. Your knee and hip should be in alignment with each other, so make sure the pillow is not too high or low

• BACK SLEEPER: try placing a pillow or two under your knees. This will put your spine into neutral position.

• STOMACH SLEEPER: try placing a pillow under your hips. This will help take the curve out of your back and put your spine into neutral position.

*Side sleepers can use a regular sized pillow, body pillow, or snoogle which is usually recommended during pregnancy but can be helpful for people with low back pain. For all positions however, the size and thickness of the pillow may vary from person to person based on flatness/density of the pillow. It is best to test out different sized pillows for each position to see which works best for you and your spine.
If none of these positions help relieve your lower back pain after a few nights, schedule an appointment with us at Performance Plus Physical Therapy so our Therapists can help identify the cause of your pain. Other than that, happy resting!

Hydration, Physical Performance & Recovery

With the warmer months rapidly approaching it is important to remember the significance of our daily water intake. Especially combined with physical activity, hydration can play a huge factor in performance and muscle recovery. Approximately 1-2 Liters of water are required to replace obligatory losses for even sedentary adults in a temperate climate. Therefore, almost double that should be consumed for modest amounts of exercise. That means increased activity during sport, a gym workout or even a physical therapy session can further dehydrate our bodies.

Proper hydration can help ensure optimal muscle function and prevent muscle cramps as well as excess fatigue. Along with enough rest, staying properly hydrated can aid in muscle recovery and repair after an injury or workout. Water intake also directly contributes to heat exchange and the demands of body temperature increases with physical activity or environment. This means that when we sweat due to exercise or hot temperatures, we are losing valuable fluids and we should drink extra water to make up for the loss. Studies show that the average male and female should have a water intake of 3.7 and 2.7 L per day, respectively. Although, considering factors such as metabolism, diet, climate and clothing, additional water should be considered for daily consumption.

We also must pay attention to some of the food we eat or the beverages we drink as either helping or hurting our hydration status. When in doubt, enough water can always help meet our bodies’ needs for hydration, peak physical performance, and recovery!

The Great Debate: Ice vs. Heat

It has long been debated whether ice or heat is better to treat pain. A study published by Garra G et al. in 2010 researched the efficacy of heat and ice in treating neck and back pain, concluding that both treatments provide mild relief. According to this study, the best option is whatever the patient feels most inclined to try. Especially in low back pain and neck strain, people are more likely to want heat, so they achieve relief simply by satisfying that need. “The only real leverage hot and cold packs have is on our nervous system — alarming or relaxing, soothing or irritating — and that in turn is strongly determined by context and how we feel about it.” To elaborate, heat is often thought of as comforting, or with a relaxing element. A hot pack therefore does not tend to “alarm” the brain, as would an ice pack being placed onto someone’s bare back. One may think of going to a spa for a full body massage, where warm oils or heated rocks are used as part of the treatment, thus garnering the correlation of heat to being soothing. Versus the shocking and breath-taking element of, say, the “ice bucket challenge” in which thousands of individuals poured freezing ice water onto themselves.

The bottom line?

• Ice should be used to reduce areas of inflammation and for acute injuries.
o The key characteristics are redness, swelling, pain, and warmth.
o To counteract this heat and reduce the swelling, ice is most often used as the initial treatment for soft tissue injuries such as sprains and strains.
o Soft tissue injuries, or STIs, are damages of muscle, ligaments, and tendons.
o Heat will make inflammation worse and will lead to more pain around injury site
o Ice can be applied using an ice pack covered by a cloth, never directly onto the skin in order to avoid further tissue damage.

• Heat is best to relieve tightness, tension, pulled muscles, and chronic pain
o May be better for chronic pain to give temporary relief
o Chronic low back pain, for example, welcomes heat therapy much more than it would ice.
o Chronic pain, stiffness, and soreness can be treated using heat because heat helps the muscles relax, which then improves blood circulation and reduces muscle spasms.
o Heat also treats trigger points. While they are not complete muscle spasms, they are tiny muscle cramps, which tend to be aggravated in the cold. These sensitive areas of soft tissue are likely what individuals are referring to when they mention a “knot” in their neck, for example.
o Heating pads use dry heat and steamed towels use moist heat to provide the soothing heat. Paraffin wax is used to relieve pain, most commonly as a hand dip for those with arthritis.

And why not both! Introducing contrasting therapy:
• Contrasting therapy act of the immediately switching between heat and ice to make muscles more adaptable to changes
o Contrasting therapy is a quick solution mostly used with athletes looking to recover from a competition and get back in game.
o Easy and cheap solution – little risk of harming the muscles, as it allows your muscles to work out, due to the stimulation of the contrast, without the stress of a physical workout.

 However, more research needs to be done
Ultimately, it is best to use “whatever feels best”
o “Ideal uses of ice and heat are roughly equal in potency” (Paul Ingraham, PainScience.com)
o Using ice when already cold can lead to more muscle tension, and using heat when the body is already hot may shock the body
o When individuals change their mindset from believing that heat is a cure-all for any and all chronic pain, they may find that ice is able to soothe them as well.

References:
Garra G, Singer AJ, Leno R, et al. Heat or cold packs for neck and back strain: a randomized controlled trial of efficacy. Acad Emerg Med. 2010 May;17(5):484–9. PubMed #20536800.

“Did you take a weekend course to become a Physical Therapist”

I am often asked “do you have a certificate to practice physical therapy?” or “did you have to take a weekend course to do this?” I can’t help but chuckle and remind the patient that they are in good hands and in fact, most licensed Physical Therapists now hold a doctorate degree. To be clear, the profession has evolved over the years and at one time a bachelor’s degree was the norm. Next came a master’s degree and currently most accredited universities offer a doctorate degree. A Physical Therapist now completes roughly 7 years of education. All Physical Therapists complete a rigorous doctoral program and are equipped to begin to treat patients. However, Physical Therapists vary in their skill sets, post doctorate educational levels and certifications as well as experience. We highly recommend you seek a licensed Physical Therapist that performs hands on, manual physical therapy and holds a Board Certification or regularly participates in continuing education. Do your homework and don’t be afraid to ask about your therapist prior to your evaluation. Like any profession, therapist vary greatly in their experience, techniques, skill level and of course personality. Find a therapist that you connect well with and most importantly feel comfortable with. It may help to ask to have a brief phone conversation with your potential therapist to get an idea if he or she is the right fit for you. At PPPT, we will gladly jump on a phone call with any potential new patient. We feel it’s also important on our end to assure the patient that their condition, or complaint is something we can handle. We understand that physical therapy may not only be a financial commitment, but also a time commitment and it is important that the patient understand the value of what they will be receiving prior to committing.